Locus of control

Where is your locus of control?

Where is your locus of control?

I have always found the Locus of control theory fascinating and the psychology behind it. For me, working on your Internal locus of control has massive benefits to how you live your life.

The term “locus of control” was coined in the 1950s by psychologist Julian B. Rotter. It refers to a person’s perception of their level of control over the events and results in their life. Internal and external loci of control are the two main categories.

Locus of control

Internal Locus of Control:

An individual with an internal locus of control believes that they have a significant amount of control over their life and the outcomes they experience. They tend to attribute their successes and failures to their own abilities, efforts, and decisions. People with an internal locus of control are more likely to take responsibility for their actions and actively seek to influence and shape their circumstances. They believe that their actions can make a difference in achieving their goals.

Characteristics of individuals with an internal locus of control:

  • They are more likely to be self-motivated and proactive.
  • They are confident in their abilities to influence outcomes.
  • They are more likely to take risks and initiative.
  • They may experience less stress in certain situations since they believe they can handle challenges effectively.

External Locus of Control:

On the other hand, individuals with an external locus of control believe that external forces, fate, luck, or other people primarily determine the events and outcomes in their life. They tend to attribute their successes and failures to factors beyond their control, such as luck, fate, or powerful others. As a result, they may feel less responsible for the consequences of their actions and may be more inclined to rely on external circumstances.

Characteristics of individuals with an external locus of control:

  • They may feel more dependent on others or external factors to achieve their goals.
  • They may experience feelings of helplessness and lower self-efficacy.
  • They may be less likely to take initiative and may feel resigned to the belief that they cannot change their circumstances.
  • They may experience higher levels of stress and frustration when facing challenges.

It’s crucial to note that a person’s locus of control can shift throughout different aspects of their life and can be influenced by cultural, societal, and environmental factors. Internal and external locus of control can both have an impact on how people approach life, deal with stress, and respond to challenges and opportunities. While having a balanced perspective can be advantageous, building a more internal locus of control has been linked to enhanced motivation, empowerment, and a sense of agency in one’s life.

If you are looking to work on enhancing your internal locus of control please feel free to reach out via the contact form

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